2010 NFL Division Preview: NFC East

Yesterday I put up a post by Michael Wright that gave 15 thoughts he had about his New York Football Giants for this upcoming season. I hinted that my NFC East preview would be written in the near future so here it is. This is the third installment of my eight-part preview of the 2010 NFL season, breaking it down division by division. In each of these posts I will preview each team in the division and then at the end I will predict who will win the division and how the other three teams will end up behind them.

To read my other divisional previews just click on the appropriate link:

NFC South

NFC West

In the NFC East we have had a lot of drama this offseason. A face-of-the-franchise quarterback being traded to another team within the division. Big name veteran free agency signings. A team trying to bounce back from a disappointing 2009 season. A team trying to build on their first playoff win since 1996. We had a big name quarterback get bloodied in the preseason opener. There was a prima donna receiver refusing to carry pads. You get the idea. Let’s jump in.

Teams: Dallas Cowboys, New York Giants, Philadelphia Eagles, Washington Redskins Continue reading

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Let’s Define A “Truck”

According to dictionary.com a truck is defined as “any of various wheeled frames used for transporting heavy objects.”

Job well done. A great post if I do say so myself.

No, just kidding, this post is not about  a lorry -as the Brits call it- but instead it’s about the word “truck” as a verb, and more specifically the meaning it has acquired with football connotation. Most people know this term, but for those of you that don’t it is in reference to when a player (usually in possession of the ball) flattens or “runs over” his opponent – like a truck.

tim tebow hebert truck

This is not an example of somebody getting trucked

Continue reading

Friday 5 – Exciting Defenses

When I say exciting defense, what are some of the teams that immediately jump to your mind? The Ravens? Steelers? Vikings? Jets? Cowboys? What if I told you that this Friday 5 is my list of the top five most exciting defenses in the NFL right now, and not a single one of the teams I just mentioned is on it? Now hear me out before you jump to conclusions and discredit the rest of this post. I came up with with this list of top five most exciting defenses by basing it solely on numbers. That’s right, my list is purely from a statistical perspective, and that’s right, none of those teams made the cut. I started out by asking myself the basic question of what are the most exciting defensive plays? I think it’s pretty straight forward to say that they would be interceptions, forced fumbles and sacks. Bone-crushing hits would also be in there but there is no statistic for that, plus a lot of those hits result in sacks and/or forced fumbles anyhow. Starting with this as my foundation I started looking up the numbers for last season. In 2009 there were a total of 1101 sacks, 525 interceptions and 509 forced fumbles. So as a general statement (using 1 sig-fig, if you will) I think it’s fair to say that interceptions and forced fumbles are twice as exciting as sacks, based on how frequently they happen. So I developed two basic formulas:

One for the total number of exciting plays: S + I + F = N

And one for the level of excitement the team causes: S + 2I + 2F = X

Where S represents the number of sacks a team had, I represents the number of interceptions, F represents the number of forced fumbles, N represents the total number of exciting plays and X represents the level of excitement rating. I ranked the teams using the first formula, then I ranked them using the second formula, and after that I took their average from those two rankings and used that as my final number to sort the teams by. As a tie-breaker I used defensive touchdowns scored. Here’s how it panned out: Continue reading

Holmes to Jets

Santonio Holmes, Super Bowl XLIII MVP, was traded yesterday by the Pittsburgh Steelers to the New York Jets for a fifth round pick. Wow. Wow is all I can say. I don’t have a whole lot of time to write about this, but the Jets just got a steal of a deal, or should I say steel of a deal? Santonio Holmes will be suspended for the first four games of the season because he has a friend named Mary Jane. The Jets will easily be able to survive their first four games without him. The schedules aren’t set yet, but I don’t think it matters. I told my dad (and I’m praying he remembers this) the day after the Colts lost the Super Bowl this year that I thought the Jets would win it next year in response to him saying “well son, there’s always next year” and at that point I had an extremely fatalistic attitude toward everything (see this post) and now I’m basically 100% convinced that I was right, however I am now much more optimistic about the Colts (see this post) and think that they are the only team that might even be kind of capable of standing between the Jets and the Lombardi Trophy next year.

I have to go to class. Let me know what you think in the comments.

Trying to Stay True to the Rules of Being a Fan

One of the many unwritten laws of being a sports fan is that when your team wins a championship you aren’t allowed to complain about the given teams success (or lack of) for the next five years. Well this rule -like many of the other- is hard to follow, and is often broken. Some people even go as far to say that it’s ten years, but that just seems flat out impossible to me. Bryan as a Rams fan being a prime example. What shouldn’t be as hard to do is not complain about your teams lack of success, when by “lack of success” you mean not winning another championship. Unfortunately for me, that’s exactly what I’m struggling with. My team (the Colts) didn’t fall off like the Bucs, who won the Super Bowl after the 2002 season and hasn’t won a playoff game since; we didn’t slowly crumble into oblivion like the Rams (sorry, Bryan) who won the Super Bowl after the 1999 season and then three years later had a sub-.500 season and has failed to rebound; heck we didn’t even do what the Steelers did last year, failing to make the playoffs the year after winning the Super Bowl. Continue reading

What does your team need to do to make the playoffs?

This post will be similar to all of the other posts I have done on this very topic. The only difference for this one is that I will have four categories (AI, COD, HAC, AO) instead of six. But I will still be laying out for each team what they need to do to make the playoffs, clinch their division, get a first-round bye, and/or get the #1 seed in their conference. First let’s layout what the NFL playoffs would look like if the season ended right now. Continue reading

What does your team need to do to make the playoffs?

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This post will be similar to the posts I did last week. I will be laying out for each team what they need to do to make the playoffs, clinch their division, get a first-round bye, and/or get the #1 seed in their conference. First let’s layout what the NFL playoffs would look like if the season ended right now.

In the AFC the seeding would be as follows: 1. Indianapolis Colts, 2. San Diego Charger, 3. New England Patriots , 4. Cincinnati Bengals, 5. Baltimore Ravens, 6. Denver Broncos… so the Bengals and Pats flipped and the Ravens jumped both the Jags and the Broncos, knocking the Broncos down to the 6 seed and the Jags out all together.

In the NFC: 1. New Orleans Saints, 2. Minnesota Vikings, 3. Philadelphia Eagles, 4. Arizona Cardinals, 5. Green Bay Packers, 6. Dallas Cowboys. Absolutely nothing has changed here.

However, six of the 12 teams I just listed are still in danger of not making the playoffs at all. To determine how much danger they are in and what the other teams in the league need to do and have happen from them to replace one of those teams I will be using the NFL’s official tie-breaking procedures to see who needs to win which games to reach the postseason.  I will be grouping the teams into six categories (AI, COD, HAC, CFH, MML, AO) you’ll see what it all stands for below) to separate them by mathematical probability of making it to the playoffs. Here are the categories: Continue reading

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